Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst

(via kilyoum)

David Maisel
History’s Shadow, x ray photos of statues.

Pixel Clouds
by Daniel Arsham

Lucie Rie


Monumental Marilyn Monroe Sculpture a 26-foot-tall sculpture of Monroe in her famous pose from the film “The Seven Year Itch” Debuts In Chicago at Pioneer Court—401 N. Michigan Ave.
by Seward Johnson

Monumental Marilyn Monroe Sculpture

a 26-foot-tall sculpture of Monroe in her famous pose from the film “The Seven Year Itch” Debuts In Chicago at Pioneer Court—401 N. Michigan Ave.

by Seward Johnson


Karl (Charles) XIII Lion Statue
Charles XIII’s Square, Kungsträdgården Stockholm. Sweden
lions sculpted by Bengt Erland Fogelberg (1786–1854),  added in 1824, and each of which are holding a ball carrying the Norwegian  and Swedish coat of arms alluding the Swedish-Norwegian Union  initiated by the king.

Karl (Charles) XIII Lion Statue

Charles XIII’s Square, Kungsträdgården Stockholm. Sweden

lions sculpted by Bengt Erland Fogelberg (1786–1854), added in 1824, and each of which are holding a ball carrying the Norwegian and Swedish coat of arms alluding the Swedish-Norwegian Union initiated by the king.


Paige Bradley created one of the most striking sculptures I’ve seen in recent times. Her masterpiece, entitled Expansion, is a beautiful woman seeking inner piece but fractured and bleeding with light.  “From the moment we are born, the world tends to have a container already built for us to fit inside: a social security number, a gender, a race, a profession,” says Bradley. “I ponder if we are more defined by the container we are in than what we are inside. Would we recognize ourselves if we could expand beyond our bodies?”

Paige Bradley created one of the most striking sculptures I’ve seen in recent times. Her masterpiece, entitled Expansion, is a beautiful woman seeking inner piece but fractured and bleeding with light. “From the moment we are born, the world tends to have a container already built for us to fit inside: a social security number, a gender, a race, a profession,” says Bradley. “I ponder if we are more defined by the container we are in than what we are inside. Would we recognize ourselves if we could expand beyond our bodies?”